Reader's Comments


Walter Vaughn    Iuka MS
Well iam his DAD.Some of ur info was out of sequence but i know people were able to get the concept..Thank u .. Delaware called me at 10am their time and i asked them about what was going on, b/c My son was in IRAQ and i was up all night and felt like something bad was happening.They ask me where my x wife was and i told them.I was told that,, they were sorry but all contacts had to be made before they could tell me anymore..well u know my day was like HELL.When i saw then drive up in my driveway ,,no one had to tell me anymore things,i knew.That was the worse day of my life.

Merrill Scott     Tupelo MS
My thanks to all the soldiers present and past that have given so much for the freedoms we enjoy.  Also, my thanks and prayers for the families that stayed behind and kept the home fires burning.  May God bless each of you.

LACY CRUM     WALNUT, MS
THANKS JAYBIRD FOR SERVING OUR COUNTRY.MAY GOD BLESS AND KEEP YOU THE FAMILY.

Ray & Lola South     Iuka, MS
May The Lord bless and keep you in his care.
JAYBIRD
SGT Jason Vaughn
Died May 10, 2007 in Iraq








Army Sergeant Jason Vaughn was born prematurely. Barely 5 pounds and 4 ounces at birth, his family called him “Jaybird” because he was so scrawny. But the boy who was born scrawny was never weak or feeble. He was actually quite adventurous. His mother once caught him dangling his feet out of a window on the second story. His first few years of life were spent crisscrossing the country with his missionary parents, who finally settled into ministering in La Paz, Bolivia. In 1990, the family moved to the hometown of Jason’s father, Iuka, MS. There he would graduate from Tishomingo High School. He worked at Country Squire Restaurant in his junior and senior years.

Jason joined the Army in 2003 at age 25. His first tour of Iraq from November 2003 to November 2004 brought about many close calls. Jason came back to Iuka to visit in Christmas 2004. His father noticed that Jason was making a very intentional effort to spend time with his family and closest of friends. In a private conversation, Jason told his father that he felt his luck might be running out.

Nevertheless, Jason returned to Iraq for a second tour in June 2006. On May 20, 2007, Army SGT Jason Vaughn was traveling in a vehicle when it was hit by a roadside bomb. The community of Iuka was shaken to lose such a widely loved son. Tishomingo High School dismissed their students so they could line the embankment overlooking Highway 72 and pay their respects to SGT Vaughn’s body as it passed by. So many friends turned out for SGT Vaughn’s funeral  they had to hold the funeral at the Gospel Lighthouse Pentecostal Church, the only building large enough to accommodate the crowd.

Jason Vaughn has not been forgotten by the people in Iuka. Each year, his family awards a scholarship in his name to a deserving student from Tishomingo High School. This year’s winner was Morgan Rae Hisaw. When the Vaughn family first learned of Jason’s death from the uniformed messengers, they tried to contact family members but no one answered. They then called their neighbors, the Hisaw family. It was Morgan Rae who answered the phone.

Jason isn’t only remembered at Tishomingo High School. This May, the Iuka Post Office was renamed the Sgt. Jason W. Vaughn Post Office, after a bill to rename the office was signed by President Obama. Both Rep. Alan Nunnelee and Sen. Roger Wicker helped usher the bill through Congress.  The Vaughn family would certainly rather have their son back. But the community’s support and love have been uplifting. They boy who started out as a scrawny baby named “Jaybird” has left a legacy of honor in his hometown.



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Army SGT Jason Vaughn was killed in Iraq on May 10, 2007. The post office in his hometown of Iuka was renamed in his honor five years later.

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